Kriegsflugblaetter des Simplicissimus (War pamphlets of Simplicissimus). Nr. 7. [containing a cartoon lampooning British Colonial attitude]. WORLD WAR I. - GERMANY / COLONIALISM / SATIRE.
Kriegsflugblaetter des Simplicissimus (War pamphlets of Simplicissimus). Nr. 7. [containing a cartoon lampooning British Colonial attitude]
Kriegsflugblaetter des Simplicissimus (War pamphlets of Simplicissimus). Nr. 7. [containing a cartoon lampooning British Colonial attitude]
Kriegsflugblaetter des Simplicissimus (War pamphlets of Simplicissimus). Nr. 7. [containing a cartoon lampooning British Colonial attitude]

Kriegsflugblaetter des Simplicissimus (War pamphlets of Simplicissimus). Nr. 7. [containing a cartoon lampooning British Colonial attitude]

Heine, Thomas Theodor; Olaf Gulbransson (illus).
Munich. Simplicissimusverlag G. m. b. h. & Co., [ 1914].
Flysheet from periodical, 4 pages, 15 1/4 x 11 1/4 inches. Light dampstaining to fore edges of front and back covers, multiple tears to edges (up to 3/4 inch) plus splits (up to 1 1/2 inch) to horizontal subscription fold across centre, 1 1/2 paper loss to top edges. Overall good condition; artwork remains clear and striking. Number 7 of the wartime pamphlets of the German satirical weekly Simplicissimus, which ran from 1896-1967, with a hiatus between 1944-1954. The magazine had a strong graphic style and featured the work of many prominent artists, including Kaethe Kollwitz. As was the case with many institutions across Europe, the magazine opposed the idea of a war until the First World War actually started, at which point the editors decided that it was their patriotic duty to support the Fatherland. The front-page caricature by Thomas Theodor Heine takes aim at Lord Kitchener, suggesting that his "terrible new element" is only the man himself, all sound and fury. The Norwegian artist Olaf Gulbransson mocks Britain's recruitment of colonial subjects to its cause, depicting a soldier rallying troops of alligators, kangaroos and Native Americans while effete Englishmen lounge in armchairs in London. Another sketch by Heine shows Russian soldiers using the bodies of their fallen Polish allies as a protective wall, while Ludwig Thoma, whose war experiences inspired a rightward turn in his politics, pens an ode to the heroes of the Battle of Tannenberg. Item #55751

Price: $45.00