Item #53285 Long Island or New York City's Necessity. NEW YORK - LONG ISLAND - REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT, Warren L. Starkey.
Long Island or New York City's Necessity.
Long Island or New York City's Necessity.
Long Island or New York City's Necessity.

Long Island or New York City's Necessity.

New York. Jackson Bros. Realty Company, 1910.
Rectangular string-bound photo-illustrated booklet 6 1/2 x 10 inches in soft paper wraps; approximately 58 unnumbered pages. Embossed title ("Long Island") appears on front cover printed over a brown silhouette of the island, and decorative endpapers featuring the same design. A 12 x 14 inch folding map at rear features a curved swath cutting across Long Island indicating areas offering (so it says) 30 minute access to Harold Square via the Penn-LIRR line (as opposed to one hour travel time from north of the city). An outlined heart at the center of the map directs attention to "Stewart Manor," a tract of land with presumed convenient access to the city. The Stewart Manor railway station (actually in Garden City) is pictured in the booklet, with text stating that "The Jackson Bros. Realty Company are making of Stewart Manor, Garden City, a suburban development of the very highest class." The booklet is a handsome production that has but one object: to sell, by hook or by crook, real estate. Soft bump to corners, overall very good condition. Text in the booklet makes clear the inevitable population increase as Long Island becomes more accessible to the city through rail and trolley lines and the construction of new tunnels and bridges. Text on one page states "The Acreage property of the Jackson Bros. Realty Company lies at present in the vicinity of Jamaica, Floral Park, Mineola and Garden City. This is the most beautiful section of Long Island. It has the best, most direct and largest number of lines of rapid transit of any part of the Island. It is reached by the Main Line, the Hempstead Branch and The Oyster Bay Branch of the Long Island Railroad." At another point the author observes that "Long Island with only one bridge and a few slow ferries has been the favorite suburb of this great city. What do you suppose is going to be the effect of eight tunnels and five bridges, affording thirty-six tracks of modern electric service, to this beautiful suburb?" Over and over the booklet stresses the money to be made in (their) Long Island Real Estate. Interestingly, a cursory google search of Jackson Bros. Realty Company produced postings regarding litigation involving the firm dating from the early nineteen-teens, while in January, 1913, Edgar R. Jackson, head of the Jackson Brothers Realty Company, was convicted of grand larceny in the first degree as a consequence of shady real estate transactions. (See the New York Times 1/18/1913 p. 5) In sum, a most attractive publication documenting Long Island land speculation, and one of the firms involved, in the early 1900s. Only one WorldCat listing. Item #53285

Price: $231.00